Artist Interview: Matt Falcone

Louis-Capet-XXVI-Music-Publishing-beatport-spec-2500-x-2500

Tell us about yourself and your music

Were a multi – Genre label… possible one of the oldest EDM labels in America, though through the course of time we switched ownership a few times. We also own a very old Laser Show Company, and because of that, we were one of 10 companies or less inside the USA producing lasers at festivals. This gave us an upper hand for working all over the USA and also made it really easy for us to book our artist at events, unlike a traditional artist management/booking agency.

Talk to us more about your latest release

Our next release, called “So in Love” and is from an up & coming to young rapper Mickey Zobel, who won the best rapper on MTV’s Andy Milonakis Television Show. The song also features his beautiful sister Lily and was produced by one of our top artists Epic Micky who currently has radio play for 7 of songs at this time, some getting up to 80 plays a month on Sirus XM and he also been introduced twice on BBC. At this time, he has 375 EDM dance songs in his discography. I would consider the genre “Mainstream Dance” because it’s sort of a cross-genre of rap & progressive house.

https://soundcloud.com/epicmickyuk/epic-micky-lily-zobel-featuring-mickey-zobel-im-so-in-love-original-mix

What inspired you to write this release?

It was written by Lily Zobel, in 2014… and a mutual friend shared the youtube with us, so we asked if we could write a song around the lyrics. Some time passed, about a year, going back & forth until all the parties involved had a version they were happy with, and now we’re getting ready for the release on Memorial Day Weekend 2018.

Describe the writing and recording process

The writing & recording process varies from artist to artist on our label. Some are veterans, and they have been in the industry for a long time, and some are very young in their 1st year. Each artist has their own unique method & software. Some of them take their time on a song, and they don’t like to release until after a few months of production, and some are a bit the opposite they could write one song in a day & call it all final. Both methods, seem to me to produce similar and equally good results. I can’t say one method is better than the other.

Any plans to release a video?

For this new release “So in Love” we have two people working on two different lyric videos. The artist Mickey Zobel also has plans for a real music video, which at this time he may have somewhere around 10 to 20 professional produced video. As for our self, the label we don’t really get involved in music video production quite as much as we should. It’s a very time-consuming process and involves a lot of different software. We have a lot of ties in the television & movie industry, some relative and some very good friends… but, whenever we ask our Film or TV executive friends to produce a music video for us, there’s always a list of reasons why they can not, such as time, money, or a conflict of interest with the studios. Sometimes we get involved, as we’ve done lasers on a few real music videos for TV, with real budgets, but as in-house were sort of know for our documentaries. We currently have over 200 documentaries, most of which are over an hour to two hours long. This all started before cell phone companies started installing cameras in cell phones, as over 10 years ago when we doing lasers at 4 festivals a week, and people were not allowed to bring in video equipment to a concert, we were always one of the only people with a camera. We shot almost every big name in the industry, from Run DMC, Jay Z, Bust Rhymes, Jay Rule, Avril Lavigne, Cobra Starship, LMFAO, Kelly Clarkson, Big Time Rush, Steven Tyler, Lita Ford Ted Nugent, Bret Michaels, Ultra Music Festival, Detroit Electronic Music Festival, and Washington DC Capital Pride PArade, plus many more Billboard Charted artists.

https://www.youtube.com/laserlightshoworg

Any plans to hit the road?

We’re always on the road since we own a laser company. Sometimes the shows slow down a bit for us in the winter since we’re located up north near New York City… but we’re sort of happy were not on the road like we used to be from 1996 to 2004 doing 4 shows a week. It’s very hard work, and it’s brutal on our bodies, our vehicles, and our equipment… plus the trips always come with a set of obstacles like dealing with difficult people in demanding situations.

As an indie artist, how do you brand yourself and your music to stand out from the rest of the artists out there?

The laser company is a big plus, not many people can say they’ve toured with Snoop Dogg, Linkin Park, and Jay Z…. plus over 200 other artists as we have, and have the videos to prove it. Whether or not were up to their singing with them or not, the final result is on our youtube page, and whether it’s for one of our artists performing, or us producing lasers at an event, our clients the audience all go to the same youtube page. I’ve been saying for years if you come home with no photographs & no video… then you have no proof we were there at all, and you might as well say we didn’t even work the festival.

Who have you been listening to lately?

I don’t listen to much music, I’m what you call a chart reader. I read lots of various charts every week, then I read about the artist & I google them to try to determine what they’re doing for marketing and where their advertising at. I also visit radio station web sites frequently, and read their playlists… but rarely listen. When I do listen to a song, I always just skip thru it, because I really do not have the time to listen to a whole song.

Who are your biggest influences?

Our biggest influence would probably be the founders of our company who went on to endeavor other projects. They were very influential musically in the transition from Acid-Rock to Acid-House in the late 1980s. They also started the laser company which was handed down to us, as they may have been the 5th company inside the USA to do so. But, the rode the wave too long during the 90’s when it was still underground, but it may have been more difficult or maybe even easier because at that time there were really only like 1000 or so electronic music producers, so making a name was much easier then today were there can be 20,000 electronic producers. Eventually, they moved on to other more lucrative projects like being an executive producer of some very popular children’s television shows and movies.

Tell us about your passions

Veganism. I myself (Matt Falcone) the owner/operator of Louis Capet XXVI has been a vegetarian since a very young age around the year of 1997, and have been vegan since maybe the year 2000. I like to spend my spare time volunteering & arguing for groups like PETA online and in the real world. Though its something 95% of the population disagrees with, and also something maybe 99% of my artists disagrees with, each year the vegan & vegetarian population gets bigger & bigger. It has a lot of potentials, unlike let’s say smoking those electronic cigarettes.

What else is happening next in your world?

There’s always a lot happening, and unlike what you might hear from every other artist… I may tell a different story, we look forward to possibly a few more Court disagreements, more equipment problems, more festival problems, and more employee/artist problems. Working in music is not as glamorous as it’s portrayed in some music videos. It’s a very very cut-through and backstabbing industry, and it’s also a very difficult business to operate. I myself was an operator of a few mortgage brokerage firms, and I can say working as a music publisher is probably a 1,000 times more difficult.

 

 

Thanks for an awesome interview, Matt

 

 

Connect with Matt Falcone

Website: http://www.LaserLightShow.ORGFacebook: http://www.Facebook.com/KingCapetXXVITwitter: http://www.Twitter.com/LaserLightShowReverbnation: https://www.reverbnation.com/LaserShowSoundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/louis-capet-xxviYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/laserlightshoworg